MANCOR DE LA VALL
Towns, villages and hamlets

The valley of Mancor de la Vall is in Mallorca’s Raiguer area, although its lands and people all form part of the Tramuntana mountains, sheltered by the Tossals and Massanella massifs. In the past, its scattered settlements were made up of little groups of buildings that had once been ancient farmsteads, known today as Biniatzent, Massanella, Biniarroi and Mancor. All of them were located close to the natural resources needed to survive in this area of common land. The valley’s slopes are conspicuous for their olive and carob trees and livestock-farming or fruit and vegetable-growing areas.

Son Morro

Son Morro (Vicenç Sastre)

The village of Mancor de la Vall

At the entrance to the village, on the Inca road, is the 19th century wayside cross. Font de la Vila (1) is an Islamic qanat (an underground gallery containing a water channel channel), whose spring can be found at the end of the street of the same name. Toward the centre of the village is a big house called Son Morro (2) with a big round arched entrance door and two Renaissance windows. It features an oil press, now declared an item of cultural interest. Close by is another house, Can Marquesí, with a similar window. Plaça de Baix, a square formerly known as Plaça Reial, is the heart of Mancor’s old quarter, where the remains of a mosque were found. In the upper square, Plaça de Dalt, the village church and vicarage (3) were built. Carrer Major, Carrer de Bartomeu Reus and Carrer del Fang are three streets that all contain big houses of architectural interest. In this part of the village, ancient roads meet like Camí de Massanella, Camí des Rafals, Camí de Biniarroi and Camí de Santa Llúcia.

Font de la Vila

Font de la Vila (Vicenç Sastre)

Camí de Santa Llúcia and Camí de Biniarroi

If you walk along Carrer de Sa Costa, you come to a cobbled stretch of paving that linked Santa Llúcia Chapel (1) to the village. Standing on a hillock with panoramic views of the surrounding area, the chapel is typical of churches built after the Christian conquest, with the arrival of new settlers to the island. It has a gabled roof and diaphragm arches. Presiding over the chapel is a statue of Saint Lucy. Prior to the 12th century, it was used as a place of worship by the inhabitants of Biniarroi and Mancor. Close by is a lodging house, whose building was extended.

The road down links up with the new road to Biniarroi, which still features sections of its cobbled predecessor. Biniarroi (2) is a hamlet founded after the island’s Christian conquest on the site of an old Islamic farmstead. In 1721, there was a big landslide that affected nearby olive groves and the hamlet’s houses. In the 20th century, Biniarroi was abandoned and now it is in the process of being restored. It still features buildings with a very rustic charm.

Oratori de santa Llúcia

Oratorio de Santa Llúcia (M. A. Escanelles) 

Multimedia Gallery
Pagina principal
Son Morro
Oratori de santa Llúcia
Font de la Vila
29_mancor
28_mancor_llucia

Map

Routes and places of interest

See Route
Oratori de santa Llúcia
Mancor: Camí de Santa Llúcia and Camí de Biniarroi If you walk along Carrer de Sa Costa, you come to a cobbled stretch of paving that linked Santa Llúcia Chapel (1) to the village. See Route
See Route
Font de la Vila
The village of Mancor de la Vall At the entrance to the village, on the Inca road, is the 19th century wayside cross. See Route