SELVA
Towns, villages and hamlets

Throughout the Middle Ages, small rural settlements grew up on the site of the original farmsteads into which the Selva area was divided. 

Selva became a town in the 13th century, when it separated from Inca. Caimari and Mancor both grew latterly and Mancor became an independent village in 1925.  Other hamlets like Binibona, Moscari and Biniamar conserved their basic physiognomy and size despite 17th, 18th and 19th century development and growth.  

Can Furiós, Binibona

Can Furiós, Binibona (Vicenç Sastre)

The town of Selva

The town of Selva spreads across the lower part of Puig de Meca peak, close to the Lluc and Raiguer roads. It is made up of three districts: Valella, Camarata and Es Puig. At the entrance to the town, travelling from the south, are the wayside cross and Font de Valella spring (1). In Es Puig, you can climb up stepped cobbled streets like S’Escalonada and Sant Llorenç. There are big houses with stately façades, such as Sa Plana, Ca sa Bisbal and Cas Misser. In the main square or Plaça Major is Sant Llorenç Church (2), with its gothic façade, standing at the top of some steps on the site of an earlier church. If you walk toward Carrer de la Noblesa, you can find three big houses: Can Servera, Can Descatlar (Ca Don Perico) and Ca Don Tomàs (3).  

In the east of the town, you can find three old estate houses: Son Arnau (4), originally a lodging house for pilgrims, Son Vic, with a Renaissance window, and Son Lluc. 

L'església

La iglesia (M. A. Escanelles)

Moscari, Binibona and Caimari

Camarata spring and public washing place (1) mark the beginning of the road to Moscari, a hamlet made up of a cluster of houses built in traditional style. If you walk along Camí de sa Plaça (2), you will come across two houses–Can Gelat and Can Terrassa–, together with Santa Anna Church (3) and a water tank. In the east of Moscari is another big house, Can Riera, in addition to a wayside cross on the corner of Camí de Son Rabassa. In the north, there is a communal well known as Pou Comú. If you walk along the road that links Son Muntaner and Son Mavet estate houses, you come to Binibona (4): a hamlet that grew up around two houses, Can Beneit and Can Furiós.  

Caimari is the gateway to the Tramuntana mountains. Very close to the old church (5) is Son Albertí, the estate that gave rise to the town. In Carrer de l’Horitzó street, the oil press at Cas Manescal still works and you can visit it and see it in operation during the Olive Fair on the third Saturday and Sunday in November. Toward the north, flanking Sa Comuna public estate, you can see Ses Rotes terraced olive groves (6), now declared an item of cultural interest. The GR 222 or Dry Stone Route also passes through here, on its way from its starting point in Artà to Lluc.  

ses Rotes

Ses Rotes (Vicenç Sastre)

Multimedia Gallery
Pagina principal
ses Rotes
L'església
Can Furiós, Binibona
31_selva_llogarets
30_selva

Map

Routes and places of interest

See Route
ses Rotes
Selva: Moscari, Binibona and Caimari Camarata spring and public washing place (1) mark the beginning of the road to Moscari, a hamlet made up of a cluster of houses built in traditional style. See Route
See Route
L'església
The town of Selva The town of Selva spreads across the lower part of Puig de Meca peak, close to the Lluc and Raiguer roads. It is made up of three districts: Valella, Camarata and Es Puig. See Route