SÓLLER
Mountain roads and tracks

Each successive era has left its imprint on Sóller and a stroll through its streets and squares conjures up images of the past. The town boasts fine examples of Modernist architecture, thanks to a period of economic growth and maritime trade with Port de Sóller. A group of buildings with defensive architectural features can be found in the port, such as Es Castell des Port, Torre Picada tower, and Santa Catalina. 

The surrounding countryside is breathtakingly varied. Limestone plays a predominant role, used to make rural porches, basic dry-stone terrace walls and also architecture by well-known architects. You can also find much of an ancient network of paths, cart and mule tracks that linked up different places, overcoming the rugged terrain. 

Parròquia de Sant Bartomeu

Parroquia de Sant Bartomeu (M. A. Escanelles)

The town of Sóller

Standing in Plaça d’Amèrica square is a Modernist building called Can Cetre (1). Other examples of Modernist and colonial houses line other streets like Gran Via and Carrer de la Mar. The medieval part of the town nestles around Plaça de la Constitució, with narrow well-tended streets. In this square, two Modernist façades contrast with one another: the façades of Sóller Bank and Sant Bartomeu Church (2), designed by architect Joan Rubió i Bellver. 

Along the first stretch of Carrer de la Lluna, houses with semi-circular arched entrance doors can be seen, like Can Serra or Can Prohom (a former inn), in addition to fine examples of Modernist architecture such as Can Prunera (3). A little further on is Alqueria des Comte (4), where a water mill can still be seen.

It is well worth taking a stroll through the hamlet of Biniaraix, declared an item of cultural interest. On the way, you will see a highly original house, Can Bala, and a wayside cross. 

Detall modernista de Sóller

Detalle modernista de Sóller (Vicenç Sastre)

Camí de Rocafort and Camí des Rost

A tarmac road leads from the Ma-11 bypass, dividing later into two separate tracks. The right fork leads to Camí des Rost, which goes on to Deià, while the left fork is a cobbled mule track that runs between terraced kitchen gardens and orchards. This last track is called Camí de Rocafort (1) and it climbs up to a property of the same name. Shortly after it crosses the railway track, there is an offshoot that turns right to Castelló and Deià. A flat section goes through olive groves to a group of houses called Can Gamundí, Can Tes and Can Jeroni Gros (2). After passing through orchards and kitchen gardens, it reaches the track of Camí de Cas Xorc and Camí de s’Heretat, close to the intersection with Camí des Rost. The cobbled path continues to the oratory (3) and esplanade where two big houses, Can Prohom and Son Mico (4), stand overlooking the valley. You can return to Sóller along Camí des Rost (5), sections of which are still in perfect condition.

Camí de Rocafort

Camino de Rocafort (M. A. Escanelles)

Multimedia Gallery
Pagina principal
Parròquia de Sant Bartomeu
Detall modernista de Sóller
Camí de Rocafort
19_soller
18_soller_cases

Map

Routes and places of interest

See Route
Camí de Rocafort
Sóller: Camí de Rocafort and Camí des Rost A tarmac road leads from the Ma-11 bypass, dividing later into two separate tracks. See Route
See Route
Detall modernista de Sóller
The town of Sóller Standing in Plaça d’Amèrica square is a Modernist building called Can Cetre (1). Other examples of Modernist and colonial houses line other streets like Gran Via and Carrer de la Mar. See Route